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SOCIETY AT WORCESTER 
FEATURES CUT FLOWERS 

AVORCESTER,.lune29-Special prizes 
offered by Secretary Herbert R. Kin- 
ney for displays of cut flowers on 
round tables featured the Worcester j 
County Horticultural Society's last 
June exhibition today. The winners 
were \ Mrs Charles W. Bowker Jr,) 
Worcester, first; Mrs Ella M. Hartness, 
Sutton, second; Charles L. Marshall, 
Westboro, third; Mrs Willis C. Bever- 
idge, Worcester, fourth; Margaret B. 
Brigham, North Grafton, fifth. 

In a contest for collection of roses j 
Mrs Carroll C. Akeley, Auburn, was ' 
first; Elizabeth R. Bishop, Sutton, sec- 
ond; Mrs John D. Hassett, Worcester, 
third. Other prize winners for indi- 
vidual displays in other classes follow: 

FLOWERS— Mrs Herbert J. Eairer, Ernest 
Adshead. Auburn: Mrs Joseph F. Cummincs. 
Southville; John R. Bliss, Grafton; Charles 
West Boylston: Mrs William W. Tail. 
Oxford: Mrs Harold S. Bowker. Alton R. 
Anderson. Herbert R. Kinney. G. Norman 
Palser. Edwin Bally. Mr« Eric Olson. Mrs 
John W. Kemp, Mrs William P. Thayer, 
Worcester, 

FRUIT — Georre I. Adams. Boylston: Clar- 
ence Hutchinson, Sutton; Joseph F. Cum- 
mings, Southville: Charles I. Marshall, West- 
horn: Effie M. Ward. Auburn: Mrs Mabel 
P. Wrirbt, H. Ward Moore, Willis E. C'arv, 
Eric Olson. £d?ar M. Wilson. Fred L, 
< haniberlain. Thomas F. Power Jr, Worces- 
ter. 

VEGETABLES— Charles L. Marshall. West- 
horo: Joseph F. Cumminss. Southville: Lucy 
M. Wheeler. Berlin: ErneSt Adshead, Au- 
burn: Herbert R. Kinney. Willis E. Cary, 
Edsar M. Wilson. Worcester. 







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ANTIQUES 
King Hooper, Inc. 

The Cottage 
South Sudbury, Mass. 



DOROTHY B. BARBOUR 



75 a Chestnut Street 
Boston, Mass. 



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— Near the Wayside Inn in Sudbury, 
a realistic replica of an old-fashioned 
era! store has been erected, with the 
shelves stocked with lamp chimneys, 
penny candy, and the great variety of 
household necessitijes once found in thea# 
institutions. 





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GLASS CLUB 
AT PLYMOUTH 

$100,000 of Antique Speci- 
mens Shown by Members 

PLYMOUTH, July 11— More Uian $100,- 
miii of precious antique glass- 
Hectors at- 
: n\ enl Ion of t lip i 

9 Club, reposed tonight 
In tyayflower Hotel, carefully 

il by its ow ners. 

club, formed on Jan. 1, is meeting 
i days under the direction of 
Miss Eleanor Hudson of Winchester, 
one of the most enthusiastic of the 'col- 
lectors. Most of the glassware is oi the 
blown yariety. 




HANKS 

THE MANUFACTURE OF WORSTEDS IN 
ENGLAND &ECIAN WHEN EDWARD TJT 
INVITED A BRABANT MANUFACTURER. 
NAMED HANKS TO ENGLAND IN 1301. 
HIS METHOD OF HANDLING THREAD 
SAVE US THE WORD "HANKS" TO AP- 
« tm ,B,»««u. *»LV TO SKEINS OF TWMAD 

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PROGRAMS TO SHOW 
HOW PURITANS LIVED 

Domestic Life Exhibit at 
Salem Pioneers' Village 

SALEM, July 27— Domestic life as It 
was lived 300 years ago will be por- 
trayed here in a series of weekly pro- 
grams at the Pioneers' "Village. 

These programs will demonstrate the 
homely, simple tasks and industries of 
the early days of the pioneers: Candle 
making, the preparation and cooking 
of corn in Indian and colonial fashion, 
the making of salt and curing fish, 
thatching, the manufacture of hand- 
rolled shingles and handmade nails, 
soap making and the primitive method 
of washing clothes. 

The use of herbs and their prepara- 
tion for Winter use will be demon- 
strated in this reproduction of Gov 
Endicott's village of 1630 by descend- 
ants of the first settlers on Massachu- 
setts Bay, beginning with the first pro- 
gram of candle-making next Sunday. 
The plans also include midweek pro- 
grams to be announced later. 

The demonstrations will be held in- 
side the houses which comprise the 
village, all of them, from the dugouts 
and English wigwams, which were the 
first types of shelters to be built, to 
the large frame house of the Governor, 
correct reproductions of early Puritan 
housing, and on the three acres of 
grounds which mrround them. 




The preparation and cooking of corn 
meal from Indian and early colonial 
methods and recipes promises to be an 
i interesting feature of the program. 
Next to fish, we are told, corn or 
"Guinny wheat" was the most unfail- 
ing food supply of the early settlers 
and in its abundance and adaptability 
it did much to change the nature of 
their diet as well as to save them from 
starvation. 

The importance of fish in sustaining 
life in the first hard years of the set- 
tlement and its preparation for mar- 
ket, for the fisheries vied with timber 
in the first industries of the colony, 
will be brought out in another of the 
demonstrations. 

There will be a Puritan fashion show, 
demonstrating the different types of 
clothing and how it was made, and a 
program devoted to the Puritan chil- 
dren, showing their small tasks and 
the games they played. Gardening in 
Gov Endecott's day also will be dem- 
onstrated, and a feature of each pro- 
gram will be a lecture explaining the 
demonstration. 

All of them promise unique and in- 
I teresting entertainment, not only for 
visitors to New England during the 
tourist season but for residents of the 
section who can hardly realize the 
privations and hardships of the simple, 
sturdy people who built the founda- 
tions of their pleasant communities of 
today. 

Under the direction of the Salem 
Park Department and with the co- 
operation on antiquarians and interest- 
ed" citizens, the program has been 
designed to present a living picture 
of Salem three centuries ago, not only 
as entertainment, but as a history 
lesson and an object lesson pointed out 
by Calvin Coolidge, who, writing of 
his visit to the village in 1930, when 
it was built as Salem's part of the 
Massachusetts tercentenary, contrasted 
the conditions in 1630 with those of 
today and said: 

"It would be wholesome to think 
more of these things. It would re- 
duce complaint and increase content- 
ment" 



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-CHILDBENS UJNCHEON MENU- 
Served from 12:00 to 2:30 Only 



-CHIIDHEN'S AFTERNOON TEA MENU- 
Served between 3:00 and 5:00 P.M. Only 



Combinations 

Ho. 1 - 750 

Creamed Chicken on Toast 
Coooa or Mi lie 
Choice of Plain Ice Cream 
Cookies 

No. 2 - 750 

Soup 
Poached Egg on Creamed He* Spinach 
Baked Potato with 8utter 9 Paprika 
Coooa or Milk 
Plain Ice Cream with Cookies 

No. 3 - #1.00 

Broiled Lamb Chop 
Creamed Potatoes 
Green Peas 
Corn Bread - Dinner Ho lis 
Choice of Plain Ice Cream with Cookies 



No. 1 - 750 

Orange Sticks 
Poached Egg on slice of Whole Wheat Toast 
Cambric Tea with Cream and Sugar 
Cake A- la-mode 



No. 2 - 750 

Fruit Cup - Small 

Peanut butter sandwich 

on 

Old Gristmill Who&e Wheat Bread 

Preserved sweet pickles 

Cocoa or milk 

Sherbet 



These menus are for children ten years of age 
or under. The prices are on single service and cannot be 
served for two. 



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105 Hadley Chests 

The researclf of Rev. C. f\ Luther of 
.Amherst into the origin and structural 
complexities of the Hadley chest has 
become sufficiently famous to American 
antiquarians to warrant a sequel. To 
this peculiarly New England product, 
with its flat incised carving, the name 
of Hadley became attached because their 
■provenance seemed to centre around this 
Berkshire town. At the particular stage 
in study when Mr. Nutting's first book 
appeared, they were judged to be ex- 
tremely rare, and probably originating 
in style from a Hadley workman. Later 
on the search was pushed back to 
Nicholas Disbrowe. seventeenth century 
joiner of Hartford, and Dr. Luther was 
able to report almost 100 specim 
known to exist. At the present report 
from the Amherst pastor, the number 
has passed into its second hundred, 
some evidence has been unearthed 
place the origin of this type of decorated 
front not in Hadley nor Hartford, but In 
the earlier settlement of Hlngham, Mass 
All of which means a revision of Dr. 
Luther's "Hadley Chest" book, still In 
! manuscript form. 






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W. H. WDRMSTEAD 

P. W. M. PHILANTHROPIC LODGE F. & A. M. 

MARBLEHEAD, MASS. 
CO. C. 32ND MASS. REGT. 

PAST COM'DR G. A. R. POST B KANSAS CITY 
PAST OEPT. COM'DR OF MISSOURI G. A. R. 
PAST SEN. VICE COM'DR IN CHIEF OF NATIONAL G. A. R. 



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What reviewers and members have said about 

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American Indian 



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FINE WHEAT CROP OF 200 BUSHELS 
GROWN ON FIVE ACRES IN MARLBORO 



•■' >''' ^ .www"^w^ ' ^ ; j^^ 







MARLBORO-GROWN WHEAT. STACKED IN FARMER SHAUGHNESST'S FIVE-ACRE PLOT 



Special Dispatch to the Globe 
MARLBORO, Sept 14— While experi- 
ments in growing wheat in this sec- 
tion have been successfully tried in 
past years that stage has passed with 
Joseph H. Shaughnessy, Pleasant st, 
farmer, who has 200 bushels of excel- 
lent wheat grain ready for the mills, 
which he grew on a plot of five acres 
on his- 180-acre farm on Pleasant st, 
this season. 

Mr Shaughnessy said that some 
years ago he planted a small section 



of his land with ^wh eat and had fairly 
good success. At that time he had no 
machinery for harvesting the crop, 
but was satisfied that wheat could be 
grown to a large extent here on suit- 
able land. This year he decided to 
make a real attempt at wheat grow- 
ing and selected what he thought was 
a suitable plot in a fertile section of 
his land. He says that his success 
was far beyond his expectation. Now 
he has a harvesting machine and a 
threshing machine and while he was 
harvesting neighboring farmers gave 
• him. their assistance. 



He says that the grain is larger and 
better than any he can buy, and that 
he will have some of it milled into 
flour, but plans to feed the greater 
amount to his hens and cattle. 
"""As far as I know the mill at Way- 
side Inn in Sudbury is the only place 
where I can have the grain ground," 
Mr Shaughnessy said.— He added that 
he will continue to plant wheat. He 
also reaped a fine crop of buckwheat 
and oats and with the threshing and 
harvesting machines he now has he 
expects to raise more than enough to 
feed his herd of tattle and several 
hundred hens in future years. 



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